Throwback Thursday : The Shining Girls by Lauren Beukes

Throwback Thursday, is a new feature created by Tenacious Reader with the aim of  highlighting books from your reading past. This can be virtually anything, a book that you previously read and loved, a book that you want to highlight again, maybe it’s a book in a series and the next book is due out shortly so you want to focus some attention on the series.   Anything goes – so long as your book isn’t a current release as there are already plenty of ways to highlight the latest books.  

The book I’d like to shine the spotlight on this week is : The Shining Girls by Lauren Beukes.  This is an author that I really like.  The books of hers that I’ve read have been simply amazing, dark and imaginative.  I haven’t read all her books and that is something that I need to address but for today I’m going with The Shining Girls, difficult to believe that this was published in 2013 – I wonder if it’s due for a reread!  A book that brings to us a time travelling serial killer.  This is a dark read but it’s also absolutely compelling read and I couldn’t put it down.

The shining girlsThe Girl Who Wouldn’t Die Hunts the Killer Who Shouldn’t Exist

The future is not as loud as war, but it is relentless. It has a terrible fury all its own.

Harper Curtis is a killer who stepped out of the past. Kirby Mazrachi is the girl who was never meant to have a future.

Kirby is the last shining girl, one of the bright young women, burning with potential, whose lives Harper is destined to snuff out after he stumbles on a House in Depression-era Chicago that opens on to other times.

At the urging of the House, Harper inserts himself into the lives of the shining girls, waiting for the perfect moment to strike. He’s the ultimate hunter, vanishing into another time after each murder, untraceable-until one of his victims survives.

Determined to bring her would-be killer to justice, Kirby joins the Chicago Sun-Times to work with the ex-homicide reporter, Dan Velasquez, who covered her case. Soon Kirby finds herself closing in on the impossible truth . . .

The Shining Girls is a masterful twist on the serial killer tale: a violent quantum leap featuring a memorable and appealing heroine in pursuit of a deadly criminal.

 

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Throwback Thursday : The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett

Throwback Thursday, is a new feature created by Tenacious Reader with the aim of  highlighting books from your reading past. This can be virtually anything, a book that you previously read and loved, a book that you want to highlight again, maybe it’s a book in a series and the next book is due out shortly so you want to focus some attention on the series.   Anything goes – so long as your book isn’t a current release as there are already plenty of ways to highlight the latest books.  

The book I’d like to highlight this week is : The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett

The Secret Garden is a classic piece of children’s literature written by Frances Hodgson Burnett.  I read this many years ago and would like to return to reread it if time ever permits.  I understand that this is once again being adapted into a movie with an impressive cast including Colin Firth and Julie Waters so this could be the perfect time to pick up a copy – or is it just me who likes to read the book first?

The Secret GardenThe plot centers round Mary Lennox, a young English girl who returns to England from India, having suffered the immense trauma by losing both her parents in a cholera epidemic. However, her memories of her parents are not pleasant, as they were a selfish, neglectful and pleasure-seeking couple. Mary is given to the care of her uncle Archibald Craven, whom she has never met. She travels to his home, Misselthwaite Manor located in the gloomy Yorkshire, a vast change from the sunny and warm climate she was used to. When she arrives, she is a rude, stubborn and given to stormy temper tantrums. However, her nature undergoes a gradual transformation when she learns of the tragedies that have befallen her strict and disciplinarian uncle whom she earlier feared and despised. Once when he’s away from home, Mary discovers a charming walled garden which is always kept locked. The mystery deepens when she hears sounds of sobbing from somewhere within her uncle’s vast mansion. The kindly servants ignore her queries or pretend they haven’t heard, spiking Mary’s curiosity.

The Secret Garden appeals to both young and old alike. It has wonderful elements of mystery, spirituality, charming characters and an authentic rendering of childhood emotions and experiences. Commonsense, truth and kindness, compassion and a belief in the essential goodness of human beings lie at the heart of this unforgettable story.

Throwback Thursday : Tithe: A Modern Faerie Tale (Modern Faerie Tales #1) by Holly Black

Throwback Thursday, is a new feature created by Tenacious Reader with the aim of  highlighting books from your reading past. This can be virtually anything, a book that you previously read and loved, a book that you want to highlight again, maybe it’s a book in a series and the next book is due out shortly so you want to focus some attention on the series.   Anything goes – so long as your book isn’t a current release as there are already plenty of ways to highlight the latest books.  

The book I’d like to highlight this week is : Tithe: A Modern Faerie Tale (Modern Faerie Tales #1) by Holly Black

I love books about the fae and Holly Black’s Modern Faerie Tales were the first books of the kind that I read.

Sixteen-year-old Kaye is a modern nomad. Fierce and independent, she travels from city to city with her mother’s rock band until an ominous attack forces Kaye back to her childhood home. There, amid the industrial, blue-collar New Jersey backdrop, Kaye soon finds herself an unwilling pawn in an ancient power struggle between two rival faerie kingdoms – a struggle that could very well mean her death.

Throwback Thursday : The Grey Bastards (The Lot Lands #1) by Jonathan French

 

Throwback Thursday, is a new feature created by Tenacious Reader with the aim of  highlighting books from your reading past. This can be virtually anything, a book that you previously read and loved, a book that you want to highlight again, maybe it’s a book in a series and the next book is due out shortly so you want to focus some attention on the series.   Anything goes – so long as your book isn’t a current release as there are already plenty of ways to highlight the latest books.  

The book I’d like to highlight this week is : The Grey Bastards (The Lot Lands #1) by Jonathan French

I loved The Grey Bastards and book 2 (The True Bastards) is due out later this year (October) so this seemed like a good opportunity to highlight it – particularly for those of you who haven’t read it yet as there’s still time to do so before the next instalment lands. You’re welcome.

Below is the synopsis from Goodreads and here is my review.

ThegreybastardsSuch is the creed of the half-orcs dwelling in the Lot Lands. Sworn to hardened brotherhoods known as hoofs, these former slaves patrol their unforgiving country astride massive swine bred for war. They are all that stand between the decadent heart of noble Hispartha and marauding bands of full-blood orcs.

Jackal rides with the Grey Bastards, one of eight hoofs that have survived the harsh embrace of the Lots. Young, cunning and ambitious, he schemes to unseat the increasingly tyrannical founder of the Bastards, a plague-ridden warlord called the Claymaster. Supporting Jackal’s dangerous bid for leadership are Oats, a hulking mongrel with more orc than human blood, and Fetching, the only female rider in all the hoofs.

When the troubling appearance of a foreign sorcerer comes upon the heels of a faceless betrayal, Jackal’s plans are thrown into turmoil. He finds himself saddled with a captive elf girl whose very presence begins to unravel his alliances. With the anarchic blood rite of the Betrayer Moon close at hand, Jackal must decide where his loyalties truly lie, and carve out his place in a world that rewards only the vicious.

Throwback Thursday : Jamaica Inn by Daphne DuMaurier

Throwback Thursday, is a new feature created by Tenacious Reader with the aim of  highlighting books from the past. This can be virtually anything, a book from your past that you loved, a book that you want to highlight again, maybe it’s a book in a series and the next book is due out shortly so you want to focus some attention on the series.   Anything goes – so long as your book isn’t a current release as there are already plenty of ways to highlight the latest books.  

The book I’d like to highlight this week is : Jamaica Inn by Daphne DuMaurier

Perhaps not as well known as DuMaurier’s Rebecca but an excellent read with a very dark secret at its heart.  I loved this book when I originally read it – in fact after reading Rebecca I had something of a binge read of many of her books.  This was pre blog and so I have no review – perhaps I should have a reread!  I love DuMaurier’s writing style and the fact that she uses the Cornish coastline as inspiration for many of her novels.  She’s a wonderful storyteller and I heartily recommend this book.

JamaicaInn.jpgThe coachman tried to warn her away from the ruined, forbidding place on the rainswept Cornish coast. But young Mary Yellan chose instead to honor her mother’s dying request that she join her frightened Aunt Patience and huge, hulking Uncle Joss Merlyn at Jamaica Inn. From her first glimpse on that raw November eve, she could sense the inn’s dark power. But never did Mary dream that she would become hopelessly ensnared in the vile, villainous schemes being hatched within its crumbling walls — or that a handsome, mysterious stranger would so incite her passions … tempting her to love a man whom she dares not trust.

 

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