Charmed, delighted and enchanted – top 10 new-to-me authors from 2017

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Every Tuesday over at  The Broke and Bookish we all get to look at a particular topic for discussion and use various (or more to the point ten) examples to demonstrate that particular topic.  I’ve swapped this week’s topic – it should be ‘Top Ten Favorite Books of 2017’ – but I never do a favourites list until the New Year – still time to fit a few more books in don’t you know.  So, I’m using the topic scheduled for the New Year – 2nd Jan:

Top Ten New-To-Me Authors I Read In 2017

I read quite a lot of new authors this year and this was a difficult list to narrow down (I had over 20 on my first draft).  there are some great books on here and I highly recommend them:

  1. Defender by GX Todd (Voices #1)
  2. Skullsworn by Brian Staveley
  3. The Prey of Gods by Nicky Drayden
  4. The Court of Broken Knives by Anna Smith Spark
  5. Blackwing by Ed McDonald
  6. Spoonbenders by Daryl Gregory
  7. Devil’s Call by J Danielle Dorn
  8. The Punch Escrow by Tal M. Klein
  9. Sea of Rust by C Robert Cargill
  10. The Nine by Tracy Townsend
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Now is the winter of our content, made glorious summer by this array of books

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Every Tuesday over at  The Broke and Bookish we all get to look at a particular topic for discussion and use various (or more to the point ten) examples to demonstrate that particular topic.  This week’s topic is:

Top Ten Books On My Winter TBR

This is a nice easy one.  My upcoming reads for December, January and February include the following books that I’m really looking forward to:

  1. Firestorm by Lucy Hounsom
  2. The Cruel Prince (The Folk of the Air) by Holly Black
  3. The Queen of All Crows by Rod Duncan
  4. The Wolves of Winter by Tyrell Johnson
  5. A Time of Dread by John Gwynne
  6. The Girl in The Tower by Katherine Arden
  7. Paris Adrift by E.J. Swift
  8. The Toy Makers by Robert Dinsdale
  9. Mister Tender’s Girl by Carter Wilson
  10. The Gone World by Tom Sweterlitsch

Thankful for books?

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Every Tuesday over at  The Broke and Bookish we all get to look at a particular topic for discussion and use various (or more to the point ten) examples to demonstrate that particular topic.  This week’s topic is:

Top Ten Reasons I’m Thankful For Books

This week’s top 10 was ‘books we’re thankful for’ but I’ve altered it slightly to 10 reasons I’m thankful for books:

  1. They’re so entertaining!  Reading is my hobby (you may have guessed) and I prefer  it to many other forms of entertainment.  It’s fun – do it.  Pretty please.
  2. You never feel lonely – firstly, you will fall in love with well written characters, you will care for them and worry about them.  Secondly, if you blog or interact on social media then you’ll find a whole new space where like minded people, authors, bloggers, publishers, will be more than happy to share their thoughts with you about books they love – this is perfect.  Especially for me. I can be a bit vocal about my love of books and I think I was turning into that person that would yap away about books to people who, well, just didn’t care and would therefore try to avoid me – or at least that’s the reason I’m sticking to when I see people dive into their houses or behind posts when they see me coming.
  3. Visit weird and wonderful places – when are you ever going to visit such great places.  Feed your imagination and go travelling – literally, the sky is the limit and no pesky queues at airports, worrying about if you turned the iron off or ‘did you lock the back door’ – just crack open the pages and you’re away.  Like having your own personal transportation device – ‘beam me up Scotty’
  4. Educational – perhaps a boring choice – or maybe not (I don’t think so), but by reading you improve your grammar, your vocabulary and pick up all sorts of random bits of information that stick in your brain much easier than facts and figures used to do at school.  Who knew.  Perhaps this could be a new teaching tool for logarithms…. and then on second thoughts maybe not.
  5. Watch great adaptations – how many films have you watched, or series for that matter, that come from books?  Too many to list here is all I know.  A lot.  A whole lot.  TV and cinema would be a lot less entertaining without them there books!  The is all.  Dusts of hands, stands and departs, feeling smug…
  6. Never short of choice – yeah, we all know this one.  I’m sure I read somewhere that if you read a book a day for a year you’d only have read 1% of the available books (published that year) – I could be making that up though.  As we know 79% of all statistics are made up on the spot 😀  Regardless we all know what our TBRs look like – and they’re serious are they not.  If TBRs could develop personalities mine currently looks like a curmudgeonly so and so – if TBRs could move about mine would follow me around the house and try to kill me by toppling over.  What a scary thought – death by TBR stalker.
  7. Something for everyone – no matter what you need to know about there’s probably a book been written to help you out.  I dare say everyone will come up with some special problems to prove that wrong now but at this moment in time I’m convinced it’s bang on.
  8. You can multi task – you can read a book whilst doing other things – like having a bath – the counts as multi tasking.  Or, you can do a whole host of things by listening to an audio book. I’ve found a new love for this even though I resisted it for so long (don’t know why).
  9. Your very own wormhole – this is the best so I saved it for last.  There’s nothing like that book that sweeps you away, everything else around you dissolves into background nothingness and you’re in your very own wormhole.  Yeah, that’s what I’m talking about.
  10. This one is blank for why you love books???????

“Sometimes the smallest things take the most room in your heart.”

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Every Tuesday over at  The Broke and Bookish we all get to look at a particular topic for discussion and use various (or more to the point ten) examples to demonstrate that particular topic.  This week’s topic is:

Top Ten Books I Recommend for Children

I’m not going to particularly say what ages these are for – I think they’re all fairly young although Not Now Bernard, Winnie the Pooh and the Dr Seuss books are probably slightly younger than the others and the JK Rowling book – the Philosopher’s Stone is the first and because of the way the story develops and becomes quite dark it’s a good series to read one a year so that the reader grows along with the characters in the story.  I actually had more than 10 this week but I’ve shown some restraint:

  1. David Mckee – Not Now Bernard
  2. Roald Dahl – Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Fantastic Mr Fox, Esio Trot
  3. E B White – Charlotte’s Web
  4. JK Rowling – Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone
  5. CS Lewis – the Lion The Witch and the Wardrobe
  6. JRRTolkien – The Hobbit
  7. AAMilne – Winnie the Pooh
  8. Frances Hodgson Burnett – The Secret Garden
  9. Mary Norton – The Borrowers
  10. Dr Seuss – The Cat in the Hat, How the Grinch Stole Christmas, Green Eggs and Ham

 

 

‘I am Isildur’s heir. Fight for me!’

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Every Tuesday over at  The Broke and Bookish we all get to look at a particular topic for discussion and use various (or more to the point ten) examples to demonstrate that particular topic.  This week’s topic is:

Characters who would make great leaders:

I’ve tried not to go for all of the obvious ones that immediately sprang to mind this week – although I’ve chosen a few of those – I’ve gone for a few of the smaller style characters too.

  1. Tomas Caraway from AFE Smith’s Darkhaven series.  A great set of books so far.  Tomas is a really good character.  I won’t elaborate too much upon him here as he needs to get over his own personal demons before becoming more of a leader.
  2. Aragorn/Strider.  Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings.  He’s absolutely a definite leader – even if he is somewhat resistant to start off with.
  3. Pilgrim from Defender by GX Todd – this is perhaps a strange choice as Pilgrim starts out as a loner and even by the end of the book he’s not leading masses of people around so don’t get me wrong on that score.  But, he’s a survivor and he’s the sort of person that you would feel you could follow.
  4. Jackal from The Grey Bastards by Jonathan French.  Again, Jackal spends most of his time in a trio with two other companions – but, he’s sharp witted and ambitious really and you have the distinct impression that he’s the one calling the shots.
  5. Toby Daye from Seanan McGuire’s October Daye series.  I love this character and I do seem to rely on her quite often for these lists so really she seems to be leading me around by the nose a little.  Toby is the sort of character that comes up with plans, she improvises and thinks on her feet and considering she spends a lot of her time being hurt or covered in blood it’s perhaps as well that she does.  She’s a bit of a rogue element in this series but she definitely has a small band of determined and loyal followers and friends.
  6. Another obvious one – Hermione Grainger –  or maybe not so obvious – I think that Hermione would be a very good leader.  She’d take to the role easily, perhaps she’d become a bit of a bossy boots, who knows, but I think she’d work out well.
  7. Darrow from Pierce Brown’s Red Rising.  Darrow becomes the lead character in the fight against slavery and injustice.  He undergoes major changes in order to be secreted amongst the very people who he wishes to overthrow.  A stunning series.
  8. Tao and Roen from The Lives of Tao by Wesley Chu.  Tao is an alien, living in symbiosis inside the body of Roen (unwillingly I might add).  Tao is part of a group of aliens who are trying to protect humans.  Together they make a rather good team and go from strength to strength.
  9. Daenerys Targaryen – needs very little explanation I think.  A wonderful character and mother of dragons.  Game of Thrones.
  10. Your choice??

 

 

 

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